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Diarrhea isn't something people (generally) like to discuss, which may explain why there are so many common myths circling about the condition. In addition to taking diarrhea treatment medicine for adults, the more you know about how to deal with it, the better positioned you will be when it strikes.

To help you out, read on for the five most common myths about diarrhea.


Myth 1: There is just one type of diarrhea

At some point in their lives, most individuals have suffered through a bout of diarrhea. While it isn't pleasant, most of the time, it can be cured with some anti-diarrhea medicine for adults and lots of water1.

However, this is not the only form of diarrhea; there are two types: acute and chronic1.

✓  Generally, acute diarrhea lasts for up to two days1 and results from a bacterial, viral, or parasitic infection.


✓  Chronic diarrhea lasts longer than acute diarrhea (about four weeks) and is generally due to a more severe problem such as Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's disease, or Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). These conditions create inflammation in your digestive tract and can continue to get worse if they aren't treated.1


If you think you may be suffering from one of these conditions, make an appointment to speak with your doctor as soon as possible.



Myth 2: The seasonal flu causes diarrhea.




Many individuals believe that diarrhea is one of the flu symptoms, but this is very much a myth: diarrhea is not a symptom of the seasonal flu2. While the seasonal flu may make you feverish and cause you to suffer general pain, it is a disease of the respiratory tracts and lungs and therefore doesn't affect your digestive system.

On the other hand, the stomach flu can cause diarrhea2; however, this is different from the seasonal flu.



Myth 3: You shouldn't eat fatty foods.



While greasy, fatty foods are hard to digest and may worsen your diarrhea, there are some types of foods containing fats that may ease your diarrhea2:


✓  Mayonnaise


✓  Butter


✓  A small amount of lean meat


Incorporating some of these into your next meal may help with your symptoms as these fats are digested slowly.

Eat light things on the first day:


✓  Bananas


✓  Rice


✓  Apple cider vinegar


✓  Toast


✓  Tea


After that, you need to return to your regular diet to ensure you are consuming all the necessary nutrients.


Myth 4: Drinking liquids will make my diarrhea worse.



Despite the fact that your excretion is more liquidy than usual, your body is quickly becoming more dehydrated3.

Therefore, while suffering from diarrhea, you want to ensure that you are consuming enough liquids (water or sports drinks) to replenish your body's fluid levels. In fact, not drinking liquids is the worst thing that you can do for your health at this time.

That being said, you want to avoid consuming caffeine1, such as coffee and tea, as caffeine is a diuretic and stimulates the body's processes (including digestion), making your diarrhea situation worse.

For most individuals suffering from diarrhea, the dehydration symptoms will be limited to feeling very thirsty and producing dark yellow urine. If you start to feel faint or fatigued while being dehydrated, visit the emergency room immediately3, as you may need IV fluids to tackle the dehydration.


Myth 5: Diarrhea goes away on its own, and I have to struggle through it.


While, in most cases, diarrhea does go away on its own, that doesn't mean that you have to struggle through it. In fact, over the counter probiotics and medicine can offer significant respite from symptoms.

For example, Enterogermina 6 Billion reduces diarrhea symptoms while also enhancing your overall digestive health. By taking these probiotics, you are helping to effectively reduce the symptoms and the duration of your diarrhea, restore the balance of your gut flora, and decrease the gastrointestinal side effects of antibiotics.

Enterogermina 6 Billion is the effective, convenient diarrhea relief you need when you are on the go.

Do you often suffer from diarrhea? What do you think your triggers are? How are you planning to relieve it moving forward? Let us know your thoughts and any additional insights you have in the comments below.




References:

  1. Cleveland Clinic. Diarrhea. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/4108-diarrhea. Last accessed on Feb 11th 2021.
  2. Web MD. Myths and Facts About Diarrhea. https://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/ss/slideshow-diarrhea-myths-facts. Last accessed on Feb 11th 2021.
  3. Healthline. Diarrhea After Eating: Why It Happens and How to Stop It. https://www.healthline.com/health/digestive-health/diarrhea-after-eating. Last accessed on Feb 11th 2021.